John Gokongwei on Phils (a good read).. what do you think?

This topic contains 7 replies, has 6 voices, and was last updated by  andador 14 years, 5 months ago.

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  • #40213


    andador
    Participant

    Marhay man ta nabuhian na su alambre sa bulsa ni John Gokongwie.(ask the employees of digitel,robina,sun cellular,robina foods etc.hehehehehe.)
    Still,pina ka maurag man guiraray si MVP(Manny Pangilinan of PLDt,Smart Communications ,etc,..nagtatabang na warang kaipuhan na press release)ini ang tunay na pinoy..

  • #40210


    Anonymous

    I hopena si Mr. TYCOON John Gokongwei is not just riding the bandwagon!

  • #40195


    Allan
    Participant

    I beleive that American style of govt(democracy), commerce education, is not fit for RP. Not all of this, not all of that. Sciences, yes. But politics, economics doesnt seem right. John G makes sense but to convince a lot of people to cooperate when they have their own hidden agendas.

    Most likely results from the present desperation or future desperation. We are people that beleives when there are proof or evidences. Now that its weighing down on us heavily. Pinabayaan ng bayan ang politico at liderships. Malanit ining coment ko, sana ang mga labud pati na sa mga gorang.

  • #39161


    Mikey
    Participant

    Actually, ang pagiging pilantropo ay wala sa bokabolaryo natin mga Pinoys. Marami dyanArtista at Basketball players na talagang kumkita ng malaki pero hindi man lang makapag donate ng konting barya sa mga pobre natin kababayan. I think sa mga artista, si Aga Mulak lang ang active sa mga ganitong causes! Si Juan Ponce Enrile na dating poor at now super rich (sa tutuo lang mas mayaman pa yata kay Villar) na pero walang ginawa kundi magpayaman! Kulang tayo sa pagiging George Soros!

  • #39123


    :
    Participant

    Meaning of success Inquirer (Editorial Section)Last updated 00:34am (Mla time) 08/15/2006
    Published on page A10 of the August 15, 2006 issue of the Philippine Daily Inquirer
    TYCOON John Gokongwei Jr. did a Warren Buffett on his 80th birth anniversary last Friday, donating P10.25 billion to education and other causes.
    In an interview, Gokongwei, who has certainly been a huge success in his public and private life, quoted Ralph Waldo Emerson in defining success:” to leave the world a little better, whether by a healthy child, a garden patch or a redeemed social condition; to know even one life has breathed easier because you have lived. This is the meaning of success.”
    Gokongwei wants to leave the world a little better by giving a big part of his wealth to education, for obviously he believes that education plays an important role in changing the social and economic condition of the people. A Chinese-Filipino, he believes in the truth of the Chinese saying that “if you give a man a fish, he will eat for one day; if you teach him to fish, he will eat for life.”
    Rich men have always been attracted to philanthropy; it’s their way of giving back to the people a part of the wealth that they amassed during their lives. In the United States, the fortunes of industrialists and entrepreneurs like Andrew Carnegie, John D. Rockefeller Sr., Henry Ford, J. Paul Getty and W.K. Kellogg have endowed some of the world’s richest foundations.
    Bill Gates, the richest man in the world, with a net worth of $50 billion, has established the Bill Melinda Gates Foundation which is devoting its funds and efforts to such causes as education and fighting diseases such as tuberculosis and malaria in developing countries. It was to the Gates Foundation that Buffett recently donated $37 billion of his $44-billion fortune.
    In the Philippines, we have many rich and super-rich people. According to Forbes magazine, seven Filipinos rank among the 40 richest people in Southeast Asia: Lucio Tan, 12th; Henry Sy, 14th; Jaime Zobel de Ayala, 20th; Eduardo Cojuangco Jr., 31st; George Ty, 33rd; Gokongwei, 35th; and Tony Tan Caktiong, 37th. Forbes says three of them rank among the 500 richest in the world: Henry Sy and family, 355th; Tan, 387th; and Zobel de Ayala and family, 437th.
    We are not lacking in rich and super-rich people who could do a Buffett or a Gokongwei. If they have not yet done so, we hope that they will recognize the terrible economic disparity between the rich and the poor in the Philippines. It has often been said that in our country 10 percent of the population controls 90 percent of the national income. These figures are even worse than those stated in the Pareto Principle.
    Vilfredo Pareto, an Italian economist who studied the distribution of wealth in several countries in the 1900s, discovered a common phenomenon. His study disclosed that “about 80 percent of the wealth in most countries was controlled by a consistent minority — about 20 percent of the people.” Pareto called this observation “predictable imbalance,” and it later became known as the Pareto Principle or the 80:20 rule.
    In the Philippines, the ratio is something like 90:10, indicating the depth of poverty in which the greater mass of the people is hopelessly mired. Hopelessly? No, erase that word. The future need not be hopeless if more people could be given a better education. And here is where the rich can help. Gokongwei has shown the way, and we hope that others in the economic elite will pitch in and donate substantial sums for the improvement of education in our country.
    A P1-million donation can build about three new classrooms – probably even five, as some private organizations have found out. The same amount can pay for the annual salaries of about eight teachers. Or it can buy thousands of textbooks and other teaching materials that are perennially in short supply. Or it can be used for the further training and education of teachers.
    The super-rich donors could explore the possibility of forming a foundation similar to the Gates Foundation that would be devoted solely to the improvement of Philippine education. A concerted, coordinated effort with substantial resources will help reverse the deterioration of the Philippine educational system. Ultimately, this will redound to the benefit of the national economy in general and of business and industry in particular.
    To the prospective donors we commend the words of Martin Luther King Jr.: “Philanthropy is commendable, but it must not cause the philanthropist to overlook the circumstances of economic injustice which make philanthropy necessary.”

  • #39119


    Anonymous

    doing it his wei! i’ve read about him sa entrepreneur bookazine of summit publishing. 1 of the 5 taipans ng pinas.
    teka pai rick, save ko muna tong page then read it. tsk nothing to do..insomniac grrr

  • #39110


    :
    Participant

    I like to quote this part….
    “Who should run this country?
    “I don’t know. I think it should be run by a good man, intelligent, willing to take risks. You have to know your resources and use them.”
    “Call it trite, but believe me, success can be achieved through hard work, frugality, integrity, responsiveness to change, and most of all boldness to dream. These have never been just easy slogans for me. I have lived by them. I hope that many of you in this room will some day choose to be entrepreneurs. Choose to be an entrepreneur because then you create value. Choose to be an entrepreneur because the products, services, and jobs you create then become the lifeblood of our nation. But most of all, choose to be an entrepreneur because then you desire a life of adventure, endless challenge, and the opportunity to be your best self.” – John Gokongwei, speaking at the 2002 launch of the John Gokongwei School of Management at the Ateneo de Manila

  • #39109


    :
    Participant

    Mr. John GokongWei on Cha-chaby Ducky Paredesfrom Malaya.com.ph
    ——————————————————————————–
    Mr. John, as his corporate family fondly refers to John Gokongwei, has always been known for being a practical businessman. He is not taken to flights of fancy; instead, every thought is mired on what is do-able and practical. Each time he talks to graduating classes or students, John Gokongwei has always talked practical good sense.
    Mr. John started with very little, was on the verge of poverty when he was staring out and, years later, finally through sheer hard work, – made himself into a Filipino and Asian taipan by growing his companies into the giants that they now are.
    Recently, John Gokongwei retired from active management and passed on all of his companies to his siblings and his children. This, he says, will give him more time to think, read and enjoy the rest of his life, after having lived and worked for 80 long and hard years.
    John Gokongwei’s main thoughts at 80 are two-fold: 1. Let us change our system of government; and, 2. Let us open up our economy to foreign investors. This, he feels, is the best way for us to catch up with our more affluent Asian neighbors, all of whom, by the way, have parliamentary systems of government.
    Mr. John says: “Charter change is a good thing. You can change presidents without a revolution.” Yes, that would be a blessing and, perhaps, we would also finally forget People Power, which, no matter how one looks at it, cannot be a democratic institution since it has to be in violation of whatever system of government we may have – whether presidential or parliamentary. Of course, as Gokongwei points out, in a parliamentary system, there is really no need for People Power or revolution since we would be able to change our head of government by a simple majority vote of parliament.
    Mr. John points out that the parliamentary system in Thailand, Malaysia, Singapore and Japan is working well, thank you. In contrast, “I think we’re the only country that followed the American system,” said Gokongwei.
    How did we take to the [residential system? We did as the Americans whom we then called our “Great White Father” did. “It’s like what President Bush has been saying about bringing democracy to Iraq. But what’s happening there is much worse than before he came in. The Americans just don’t learn their lesson,” said Gokongwei.
    Instead of the American model, we ought to find our role model from Asia. To Mr. John, what would be best as our models are probably Taiwan or China:
    “If we had only done what Taiwan did 40 years ago and what China did 20 years ago, we could have done it in 1945. Now, it looks like it’s too late, but there is still time.
    “We did not develop any industry beyond Coca-Cola. We had some textiles and shoes and they were completely obliterated. How many business people put in their money in an industry? Can you name five? None, you can’t even name one. In real estate you can name 10. That’s my point.”
    According to Mr. John, we missed our chance to develop our economy. We were ahead or at par with our neighbors 60 years ago but now, our Southeast Asian neighbors have left us very far behind.
    Mr. John says: “We had the same per capita income as Thailand 20 years ago, now they are two and a half times bigger than us. Malaysia is four times bigger and Indonesia, which had half our per capita then, is now our equal. In five to six years, I think Vietnam will match or even surpass us.
    “Everybody else is passing us by; that is what worries me.”
    More than changing the political landscape, John Gokongwei was excited about thinking that the time has come to also lift foreign equity restrictions in the economy. This was the same conclusion reached by a full-blown commission that studied possible amendments to the Constitution during the time of President Joseph Estrada. For us to progress, the greatest need is investors. Without investors, how do we create the industries that would employ Filipinos so that they will not have to go abroad to have a job?
    “It’s hard to open up the economy without amending the Constitution. I agree that mining and real estate should be opened to everybody because you need foreign capital to help any country develop its economy. Look at China, it is getting a lot of direct foreign investments,” Gokongwei said.
    Although foreign ownership of land and resources can be an emotional jingoist argument against foreign investors, in reality an investor cannot cart his investments out of the country.
    John Gokongwei’s own company JG Summit Holdings, is investing heavily in industry and betting on local industries to make the Philippines a tiger economy.
    Mr. John was asked about who would be the leader who would be best for this country?
    Mr. John is smart enough not to judge our past presidents or make too many comments on then but he does have a good word for one of the most maligned of our presidents:
    “(Elpidio) Quirino had the right economic policies at the time when he put up the dams like Ambuklao and pushed for the country’s industrialization. His policies were good; he was the first to see the country’s need to build up its own power because we don’t have enough money for oil.
    “Up to now, we’re always short of power and he already knew that back then in 1947. Unfortunately, (Quirino) had this problem about the P5,000 golden chamber pot. I’m not saying he was the best president, I’m just saying I liked his policies.”
    Who should run this country?
    “I don’t know. I think it should be run by a good man, intelligent, willing to take risks. You have to know your resources and use them.”
    “Call it trite, but believe me, success can be achieved through hard work, frugality, integrity, responsiveness to change, and most of all boldness to dream. These have never been just easy slogans for me. I have lived by them. I hope that many of you in this room will some day choose to be entrepreneurs. Choose to be an entrepreneur because then you create value. Choose to be an entrepreneur because the products, services, and jobs you create then become the lifeblood of our nation. But most of all, choose to be an entrepreneur because then you desire a life of adventure, endless challenge, and the opportunity to be your best self.” – John Gokongwei, speaking at the 2002 launch of the John Gokongwei School of Management at the Ateneo de Manila
    Readers who missed a column can go to http://ducky.paredes-ohana.orgYour reactions are welcome at [email protected]. Email address: [email protected]

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