2011 albay writer’s workshop

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  • #152755


    bogs
    Participant

    ANO PO BA ANG BICOLANO NG “we must value and be proud in using the bicolano language for this is our culture in which passed down by our beloved ancestors therefore we must keep this tradition” ? THANKS FOR HELPING 🙂

  • #152754


    bogs
    Participant

    ANO PO BA ANG BICOLANO NG “we must value and be proud in using the bicolano language for this is our culture in which passed down by our beloved ancestors therefore we must keep this tradition” ? THANKS FOR HELPING 🙂

  • #149387


    Dan
    Participant

    Hi Dimple,
    paki laag ko lang ining napurot kong story ta puro na sana SPAM ang nasa balyong thread. this is about pinoy culture and values as exceptionally written by British writer. related man baga sa thread na ini ta para surat man, kaya lang Brits.
    uh, sige na, poonan ta na ang pagbasa, ta magayon ining istoria. kung iisipon, mangisi kita, pero tutuo po ang sinasabi nya.
    Subject: ONLY IN THE PHILIPPINES….TRULY HILARIOUS!Not sure this is the same one that came through once, little funnynonetheless….A British journalist stationed in the Philippines and his ownobservations are so hilarious!!!! MATTER OF TASTE By Matthew Sutherland I have now been in this country for over six years, and considermyself in most respects well assimilated. However, there is one key step onthe road to full assimilation, which I have yet to take, and that’s to eatthe famous BALUT. The day any of you see me eating BALUT, please call immigration and ask themto issue me a Filipino passport. Because at that point there will be noturning back. BALUT, for those still blissfully ignorant non-Pinoys outthere, is a fertilized duck egg. It is commonly sold with salt in a piece ofnewspaper and so called the complete appetizer of the day: first is to sipthe juice (soup) then eat the remaining “thing”. You can buy it at a lowerprice (cracked shell). Much like English fish and chips, by street vendorsusually after dark, presumably so you can’t see how gross it is. Food dominates the life of the Filipino. People here just love to eat. Theyeat at least eight times a day. These eight major meals are called, inorder: breakfast, snacks, lunch, merienda, merienda ceyna, dinner, bedtimesnacks and no-one-saw-me- take-that- cookie-from- the-fridge-so-it-doesn’t-count. The short gaps in between these mealtimes are spent eating Sky Flakes fromthe open packet that sits on every desktop. You’re never far from food inthe Philippines. If you doubt this, next time you’re driving home from work,try this game. See how long you can drive without seeing food and I don’tmean a distant restaurant, or a picture of food. I mean a man on thesidewalk frying fish balls, or a man walking through the traffic sellingnuts or candy. I bet it’s less than one minute. Here are some other things I’ve noticed about food in the Philippines :First, a meal is not a meal without rice – even breakfast. In the UK , Icould go a whole year without eating rice. Second, it’s impossible todrink without eating. A bottle of San Miguel just isn’t the same withoutgambas,beef tapa or BALUT. Third, no one ventures more than two paces fromtheir house without baon (food in small container) and a container ofsomething cold to drink. You might as well ask a Filipino to leave homewithout his pants on. And lastly, where I come from, you eat with a knifeand fork. Here, you eat with a spoon and fork. You try eating rice swimmingin fish sauce with a knife. One really nice thing about Filipino food culture is that people always askyou to SHARE their food. In my office, if you catch anyone attacking their baon, they will always go, “Sir! KAIN NA TAYO!”(“Let’s eat!”). This confused me, until I realized that they didn’t actually expect me tosit down and start munching on their boneless bangus. In fact, the politeresponse is something like, “No thanks, I just ate.” But the principle issound – if you have food on your plate, you are expected to share it,however hungry you are, with those who may be even hungrier. I think that’sgreat! In fact, this is frequently even taken one step further. Many Filipinos use”Have you eaten yet?” (“KUMAIN KA NA?”) as a general greeting, irrespectiveof time of day or location. Some foreigners think Filipino food is fairly dull compared to other Asiancuisines. Actually lots of it is very good: Spicy dishes like Bicol Express(strange, a dish named after a train); anything cooked with coconut milk;anything KINILAW; and anything ADOBO and/or SINIGANG. And it’s hard to beatthe sheer wanton, cholesterolic frenzy of a good old-fashioned LECHON deleche (roast pig) feast…. Dig a pit, light a fire, add 50 pounds of animalfat on a stick, and cook until crisp. Mmm, mmm…. you can actually feelyour arteries constricting with each successive mouthful. I also share one key Pinoy trait —- a sweet tooth. I am thus the onlyforeigner I know who does not complain about sweet bread, sweet burgers,sweet spaghetti, sweet banana ketchup, and so on. I am a man who likes toput jam on his pizza. Try it! It’s the weird food you want to avoid. In addition to duck fetus in thehalf-shell, items to avoid in the Philippines include pig’s blood soup(DINUGUAN); bull’s testicle soup, the strangely-named “SOUP NUMBER FIVE” (Idread to think what numbers one through four are); and the ubiquitous,stinky shrimp paste, BAGOONG, and it’s equally stinky sister, PATIS. Filipinos are so addicted to these latter items that they will even riskarrest or deportation trying to smuggle them into countries like Australiaand the USA , which wisely ban the importation of items you can smell frommore than 100 paces. Then there’s the small matter of the purple ice cream. I have never beenable to get my brain around eating purple food; the ubiquitous UBE leaves me cold. And lastly on the subject of weird food, beware: that KALDERETANG KAMBING(goat) could well be KALDERETANG ASO (dog)…. The Filipino, of course, has a well-developed sense of food. Here’s a typical Pinoy food joke: “I’m on a seafood diet. “What’s a seafood diet?” “When I see food, I eat it!” Filipinos also eat strange bits of animals —- the feet, the head, theguts, etc…., usually barbecued on a stick. These have been given witty names, like “ADIDAS” (chicken’s feet); “KURBATA” (either justchicken’s neck, or “neck and thigh” as in “neck-tie”); “WALKMAN” (pigsears); “PAL” (chicken wings); “HELMET” (chicken head); “IUD” or “BETAMAX”(chicken intestines). Yummy (sarap naman). Bon appetit…. WHEN I arrived in the Philippines from the UK six years ago, one of thefirst cultural differences to strike me was names. The subject has provideda continuing source of amazement and amusement ever since. The first unusualthing, from an English perspective, is that everyone here has a nickname.In the staid and boring United Kingdom, we have nicknames in kindergarten,but when we move into adulthood we tend, I am glad to say, to lose them. The second thing that struck me is that Philippine names for both girls andboys tend to be what we in the UK would regard as overbearingly cutesy foranyone over about five. Fifty-five-year- olds co

  • #146381


    aris
    Participant

    is it open for everyone?

  • #145685


    minagAy0n
    Participant

    Kinseng (15) parasurat hali sa manlaen-laen na banwaan sa Probinsiya kan Albay an mapipili na mag partisipar sa tulong (3) aldaw na workshop, puon Mayo 20 sagkod 22, sa Bicol University Tabaco Campus sa Syudad kan Tabaco.

    http://goldimyrr.repolles.com/2011/02/albay-writers-workshop-opisyal-na-pangapudan-para-sa-aplikasyon/

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