GAT JOSE P. RIZAL.. 1861-1896

This topic contains 7 replies, has 6 voices, and was last updated by  andador 14 years, 9 months ago.

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  • #51456


    andador
    Participant

    @Jambo
    Nakusit mo nanggad padi!

  • #51445


    Zambo
    Participant

    mahatma gandhi, mother theresa… both did not use sword, gun and cannon, but made impact in India. and let’s not forget nelson mandela.
    brandishing an arm does not necessarily make one a hero. having said that, the government should stop tagging the OFW an unsung hero. for me, thats pathetic!

  • #51443


    GANYMEDE
    Participant

    It’s Bonifacio! not Rizal…
    anong Bonifacio?????………………
    SI AGUINALDO ANG NAGTARAM KAAN!!!!!!:)

  • #51386


    Guevara
    Participant

    It’s Bonifacio! not Rizal…
    Attempts to debunk legends surrounding Rizal, and the tug of war between free thinker and Catholic, have served to keep him a living issue. While some leaders, Gandhi for one, have been elevated to high pedestals and even deified, Rizal has remained a controversial figure. Some have succeeded in depicting his fallibility, such as the case of the numerous women in his life. In one recorded fall from grace, he had succumbed to temptation by a “lady of the camellias” in Austria, leading to a presumption that he had patronized “ladies of the night”.
    Others present him as a man of contradictions. Miguel de Unamuno in “Rizal: the Tagalog Hamlet”, said of him, “a soul that dreads the revolution although deep down desires it. He pivots between fear and hope, between faith and despair.” His critics assert this character flaw is translated into his two novels where he opposes violence in Noli and appears to advocate it in Fili, contrasting Ibarra’s idealism to Simoun’s cynicism. His defenders insist this ambivalence is trounced when Simoun is struck down in the sequel’s final chapters, reaffirming the author’s resolute stance, Pure and spotless must the victim be if the sacrifice is to be acceptable. In the same tenor, Rizal condemned the uprising when Bonifacio asked for his support. Bonifacio, in turn, openly denounced him as a coward for his refusal.
    Rizal never held a gun or sword in the battlefield to fight for freedom. This fact leads some to question his ranking as the nation’s premier hero, with a few who believe in the beatification of Bonifacio in his stead. In his defense, the historian, Rafael Palma, contends that the revolution of Bonifacio is a consequence wrought by the writings of Rizal and that although the sword of Bonifacio produced an immediate outcome.

  • #47991


    Ter
    Participant

    Is it the same as
    ” Don’t forget the faces of peopleyou see ,ON YOUR WAY UP…
    because they will be the same faces of people you will see,ON YOUR WAY DOWN”.

    uhmm uhmm uhmm…

  • #47986


    andador
    Participant

    Allan

    “Ang hindi marunong lumingon sa pinangalingan ay hindi makakarating sa paroroonan.”
    That was Rizal’s threat to the Spaniards. “If you do not go back to where you came from (Spain), I dont think you can make it here”
    Its Rizlas revelius side. Rizla’s family however have Spanish roots like Francisco Mercado; Teodora Alonzo Quintos
    So What?Is this a question????What do you mean?Sorry,i amquite lost in translation here..

  • #47870


    Allan
    Participant

    “Ang hindi marunong lumingon sa pinangalingan ay hindi makakarating sa paroroonan.”
    That was Rizal’s threat to the Spaniards. “If you do not go back to where you came from (Spain), I dont think you can make it here”
    Its Rizlas revelius side. Rizla’s family however have Spanish roots like Francisco Mercado; Teodora Alonzo Quintos
    So What?

  • #47119


    andador
    Participant

    “Ang hindi marunong lumingon sa pinangalingan ay hindi makakarating sa paroroonan.””He who does not know how to look back at where he came from will never get to his destination.”
    Let us take a look at the life of the genius,the revolusionist,the realist,the pride of the Malayan race.A man put to death because of his exposition of the artrocities and abusesof the Spanish colonizer.A man who believes in the real essence of truth rather than superstitions.A man whose intelligence was viewed as a threat rather than a gift.Tha man abhorred and condemned bythe “governadorcillos and the “Padre Damasos”A freethinker and a man of reasons.Viva Senor Senor Rizal.!!!!!!
    It’s not yet over.
    May he serve as an inspiration and a reminder to us Filipinos that the fight has never ended
    Pls. find time to read more about JPR,pls click site:
    http://www.joserizal.ph/bg01.html

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