Is GDP the best metric of economy, or you need to go further than that?

This topic contains 12 replies, has 5 voices, and was last updated by  BIO 13 years, 1 month ago.

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  • #145119


    BIO
    Participant

    LEARN THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN LINEAR GROWTH AND EXPONENTIAL GROWTH.
    LEARN THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN SIMPLE INTEREST AND COMPOUND INTEREST.
    AND WHILE WE’RE AT IT, LET’S LEARN ABOUT:

    ______ SELF-INTEREST ______

  • #144849


    Jeric
    Participant

    “Fifty years and four days ago, on January 20, 1961 (I was in THS), a newly inaugurated US President, uttered these now famous words _____ “ASK NOT WHAT YOUR COUNTRY CAN DO FOR YOU, ASK WHAT YOU CAN DO FOR YOUR COUNTRY”.” – Manoy Bio
    WHICH COUNTRY?
    “There are times when each generation is asked to sacrifice a little of themselves for the good of the country, present but mostly future, including sacrificing some beliefs, religious, political, economic, social, etc….” – Manoy Bio
    DOES THE ABOVE INCLUDE MIGRATION?
    “By the way, another quotation from that now famous inaugural address, “CIVILITY IS NOT A SIGN OF WEAKNESS”.” – Manoy Bio
    IS RESPECT OF OTHERS’ BELIEF A FORM OF CIVILITY?

  • #144844


    BIO
    Participant

    Ne Jing jing, dai ka masyadong maghadit dahil niyaon ka sa Green Archipelago. Hilinga mo ini tabi:
    “If we don’t address the issue, international confidence in Japan could be lost,” he said. “Not leaving the burden to the future generations is my most important task as a politician.”
    That statement is a trademark and an earmark and a bencmark of good leadership. He is addressing conditions in the future and good leadership sees the beginning of the future as NOW. Kung may anunsiyong may maabot na bagyo, magkaag na qui sulay buda tukod sa payagpayag, su parasira dai na maglawod, habang harayo pa su bagyo, bakong pag-abot kan bagyo saka makaramkaram.
    Like the Japanese of centuries ago, they took care of their denuded forests for the benefit of future Japanese generations. Like the post-World War II Japanese, they made sure thatthe Japanese economy rise up from the ashes of war. Those generations made a lot of sacrifices, not only for themselves but for posterity.
    Fifty years and four days ago, on January 20, 1961 (I was in THS), a newly inaugurated US President, uttered these now famous words _____ “ASK NOT WHAT YOUR COUNTRY CAN DO FOR YOU, ASK WHAT YOU CAN DO FOR YOUR COUNTRY”.
    There are times when each generation is asked to sacrifice a little of themselves for the good of the country, present but mostly future, including sacrificing some beliefs, religious, political, economic, social, etc….
    The Japanese have proven that to be true, throughout their history. There is no doubt that they can take care of the aging population problem like they took care of their deforestation problem centuries ago. The Japanese know how to take care of the future, their posterity. Like an American economist said, “The best wayto predict the future is to create it”.
    By the way, another quotation from that now famous inaugural address, “CIVILITY IS NOT A SIGN OF WEAKNESS”.
    MABALOS.

  • #144837


    Jing-jing
    Participant

    Manoy Bio, ang nasasaad ba sa article na itohttp://politics.inquirer.net/politics/view/20110124-316315/Japan-PM-pushes-for-reform-as-society-agesay hindi dapat ikabahala?

    Thanks to GB!!!

  • #144836


    Jing-jing
    Participant

    Manoy Bio, ang nasasaad ba sa article na itohttp://politics.inquirer.net/politics/view/20110124-316315/Japan-PM-pushes-for-reform-as-society-agesay hindi dapat ikabahala?

    Thanks to GB!!!

  • #144835


    BIO
    Participant

    Ne Jing jing, huwag kan mabahala.
    Like I mentioned before, the Japanese peopleknow their history and they know themselves. They have the right mindset to solve coming problems. And you know what, they do not invoke intervention of the Divine Wind, at least not anymore,as you can see from the Preamble of the Japanese Constitution which was also patterned after the US Constitution, when they go about solving their problems. The Japanese know the VALUE OF TIME, e.g., rate of growth or decline of dynamic conditions like population, GDP, posterity, etc……
    Proof?

    What has been the most successful rainforest reforestation program?

    asked 1 year ago in Deforestation 1 answer–>

    seanm

    That depends on how you define “successful.” An argument can be made that the most successful reforestation initiative of all time was the one instituted in feudal Japan in the 17th century, shortly after the Tokugawa Shogunate came to power. Japan, a richly forested land in antiquity, was severely denuded of trees over a period of centuries from the early Middle Ages to 1600. After the victory of Tokugawa Ieyasu and his assumption of control over Japan, the shogunate mandated by law processes of forest management that we would today call “silvicultural”–essentially, sustainable forestry. Given hundreds of years to take their course, the Tokugawa reforms resulted in an island that, given the history of similar environments over time (such as Easter Island) should have been barren and impoverished, but which today is a very rich country awash in natural resources and rife with robust forests. This unique success story is little understood outside of Japan, and was the subject of Conrad Totman’s 1989 book “The Green Archipelago.”Read more: http://greenanswers.com/q/68278/forests-trees-plants/deforestation/what-has-been-most-successful-rainfor#ixzz1Bwbegv3J

  • #144821


    Jeric
    Participant

    @:
    Magpaturo ka nguna ki Manoy Bio manungod sa history kan producto kan Japan kaitokumpara sa producto kan China ngunian, bago ka magpara ngala-ngalab.

  • #144819


    Jing-jing
    Participant

    Japan’s population is 127 million people. (May problema na daa, sabi ni Ne Jing jing). by Manoy Bio
    ‘yey…special mention an pangaran ko…. 😀 pa’no man dae maguiguing problema,eh…most people in that given population facts aypasiring na sa sulnupan kan saindang buhay ….. how many years from now, sairisay an mapano sa labor force na kaipuhan sa pagbayad nin mga taxes para masustiniran man an retirement fee kan mga mareretiro dahil sa padiit na populasyon?

    Thanks to GB!!!

  • #144816


    ©παςΗ
    Participant

    The point is, China has forced to cut it’s labor cost to maintain high employment rate for their large population. But they had to cut corners somewhere to meet the demands of mass production, in this case they cut corners on quality in exchange to lower salaries. That’s why there’s a notion that products made in China are merely “Chinese Junks” and unreliable. While Japan on the other hand has successfully maintained it’s reputation as the key players in the industry, making use of it’s full labor force while maintaining quality on most of their products without cutting the cost on both materials and manpower.By contrast, Japan has a fewer population but highly skilled and educated workers. There is a report of Japanese kid genius entering College at the age of 12. If China didn’t sacrifice their labor cost with such a number of large population rate, there would be a high probability that they would suffer much like the other 3rd World Countries like the Philippines. But now, China could enter the space age competition with much confidence because they made a good solution (or compromise) to provide more employment for their people. Didn’t they had their successful launch, orbit and landing of its new winged spacecraft “Zhoubeijwongfat” in March last year via Jiuquan Satellite Launch Center?). Do the Philippines have that other than “paglipad ni Agila” satellite which I think is not “Philippine made”?

    Nowadays, you could rarely find a genuine “U.S. or Made in Japan” products. Most products including Sony Japan and Fox Worth Texas’ “Radio Shack” have their assembly plants in China. Chances are most consumer electronics are now manufactured in China, including those reputable branded ones. I couldn’t think of consumer electronics brands that were made in the Philippines other than “Midland” and “Uniden”. Repair centers here are scarce too. Damaged equipment has to be sent to Singapore for instance to be repaired, or consider the services of our own local technicians (warranty void).In early 2000, the Philippines has it’s major loss to China when PGMA decided to enter the game of Globalization. Our country has just been recovering now that we entered the “call center” fad, making use of our work force and speech and marketing fluency. But for how long we could sustain such job opportunities? Now consider again this question posted in the past threads: “which is better, having a large number of population with fewer skilled and productive workers or limit the number of people but all skilled and productive? Key competitive players like ABS CBN and GMA 7 are doing wise decisions – they screen thousand of applicants only to employ the best of seven qualified employees. If they can’t extract the best from the first batch, then they’ll screen again another thousand. On the worldwide scene, can we cope up with that kind of competition given the population of an estimated 92 Billion People (The Philippines has been listed as the 12th Populous Country – http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Philippines)

  • #144813


    Jeric
    Participant

    Hehehe. As expected.

  • #144812


    Ka
    Participant

    Sir Bio,

    The unemployment rate could be one….it has impact in GDP, but I don’t see the connection of population though. Besides, I could conclude that too many employed people are richer than too little unemployed people.

    Do you have some formula which applies to all countries? Or are you just able to cite a few examples (yet to be seen) which you personally believe (your opinion)..or simply jumping to conclusion that the root cause of the problem is population.

  • #144811


    BIO
    Participant

    Tama Ka!
    GDP is no DNA. GDP, by itself, is not useful. For instance, the GDP of China is $10 Trillion. That figure by itself is not useful. Now compared to the GDP of Japan, $5 Trillion, China’s GDP becomes useful and meaningful. It means that China’s GDP is twice as large as that of Japan’s. But that’s about it. What does that mean to the average Chinese or Japanese? Not much, right? Like they say, it’s not the size but how it is used that matters.
    So let’s make GDP a little more useful and meaningful. Let’s CONNECT GDP to POPULATION.
    China’s population is 1.34 billion people (kadakulon man, sabi ngani ni Nuy Noel). Japan’s population is 127 million people. (May problema na daa, sabi ni Ne Jing jing). Meaning? China’s population is about 10 times bigger than that of Japan’s.
    So now we can make the CONNECTION: The Japanese is much more productive than the Chinese.
    One result: China’s GDP PER CAPITA is about $7,000, Japan’s, $35,000. Meaning that the average Japanese is about5 times richer than the average Chinese or the Chinese is about5 times poorer than the Japanese.
    Who enjoys a better standard of living? Who has the better quality of life?
    “I’ve been rich, I’ve been poor. But rich is better.” According to a lot of people.

  • #144801


    Ka
    Participant

    I think GDP is just a measure of economic activity and doesn’t care about quality of life or the type of economic activity. Do you think GDP contains all the information needed to measure the economy? I don’t think so…

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