New Years Day Celebrations

This topic contains 2 replies, has 3 voices, and was last updated by  dada 15 years ago.

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  • #47243


    dada
    Participant

    YES!!!!! I’VE BEEN ENCOUNTER THAT ONE IN MY NAT.SCI.2 SUBJECT…………AND THATS TRUE………..SANA PARE-PAREHO NA LANG ANG DATE NANG ATING CALENDAR ALL AROUND THE WORLD……………………..

  • #47236


    Bugs
    Participant

    Andador, ako noy ang NEW YEAR ko APRIL 14 baad pwede mo naman na iiba dyan sa listahan mo tabi…hehe

  • #47204


    andador
    Participant

    Modern new year celebrations

    For further information, see New Year’s Eve and New Year’s Day
    The most common modern dates of celebration are:

    1 January: The first day of the year in the Gregorian calendar used by most countries.

    Rosh Hashanah (Hebrew for ‘head of the year’) is a celebration that occurs 163 days following Pesach (Passover). In the Gregorian calendar at present, Rosh Hashanah cannot occur before 5 September, when it occurred in 1899 and will occur again in 2013. After the year 2089, the differences between the Hebrew Calendar and the Gregorian Calendar will force Rosh Hashanah to be not earlier than 6 September. Rosh Hashanah cannot occur later than 5 October, when it occurred in 1967 and will again occur in 2043. See Hebrew Calendar.

    In the Eastern Orthodox Church, the civil New Year (also celebrating the infant Jesus’ circumcision) falls on 14 January (1 January in the Julian Calendar). Many in the countries where Eastern Orthodoxy predominates celebrate both the Gregorian and Julian New Year holidays, with the Gregorian day celebrated as a civic holiday, and the Julian date as the “Old New Year”, a religious holiday. The Church’s own liturgical calendar begins on September 1st thereby proceeding annually from the celebration of Jesus’ birth in the winter (Christmas) through his death and resurrection in the spring (Pascha / Easter), to his Ascension in the summer, and the assumption of his mother (Dormition of the Theotokos / Virgin Mary) in the fall.

    Note: Eight of the twelve biggest Eastern Orthodox Churches have adopted the Revised Julian calendar administratively and the civic and religious holidays match. The orthodox population of Bulgaria, Cyprus, Egypt, Greece, Poland, Romania, Syria and Turkey celebrate the New Year on January 1st. The orthodox churches of Georgia, Jerusalem, Russia and Serbia still use the Julian Calendar.

    In the Coptic Orthodox Church, the New Year, called Neyrouz, coincides with 11 September in the Gregorian calendar between 1900 and 2099, with the exception of the year before Gregorian leap years, when Neyrouz occurs on 12 September). The Coptic year 1723 began in September 2005. The Ethiopian Orthodox New Year, called Enkutatash, falls on the same date as Neyrouz; it is currently 1998 in the Ethiopian calendar.

    The Chinese New Year, also known as the Lunar New Year, occurs every year on the new moon of the first lunar month, around the beginning of spring (Lichun). The exact date can fall anytime between 21 January and 21 February (inclusive) of the Gregorian Calendar. Because the lunisolar Chinese calendar is astronomically defined, unlike the Gregorian Calendar, the drift of the seasons will change the range. Each year is symbolized by one of 12 animals and one of five elements, with the combinations of animals and elements (or stems) cycling every 60 years. It is the most important Chinese holiday of t

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