Voltaire

This topic contains 7 replies, has 4 voices, and was last updated by  Rod 10 years, 7 months ago.

Viewing 8 posts - 1 through 8 (of 8 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #145803


    Rod
    Participant

    So true Padi. Ngunyan na dakol na ribok sa Middle-East, kaipuhan man nanggad na magkaigwa ki mga trabaho an mga nagbaralik na OFW. Kung dae, sabi ngani sa article, “it’s like jumping from the frying pan to the fire,” That’s why I was never a big fan of GMA and her idea of “Super Yaya” to the world. I know we’re better than that if given a chance.

  • #145800


    BIO
    Participant

    From Voltaire’s Candide:
    “Il faut cultiver notre jardin. (We must cultivate our garden.)”
    Take a peek:
    Ta marot Bulusan kita kan Mayon pag tumuga qui dakul.
    http://the-diplomat.com/asean-beat/2011/03/02/philippines-ofw-dependency/

  • #145730


    BAGZ
    Participant

    sa twing nakikita ko ang thread nato .. naalala ko si voltaire ang aking close friend nong 1st year college pa ako .. nakilala ko lang sya sa chatting (MIRC) pero naging open kami sa isat-isa..

  • #145664


    BIO
    Participant

    Sinabi mo, Pading Rod. Minsan mayparti kan lawas na kaipuhan qui diit na tama qui koryente para tumindog buda mabuhay guiraray ____ arug baga kan puso (CPR).
    Pero marhay man na binuhay ni Ne Cho si Voltaire, ta idolo ni Rizal si Voltaire.
    And the Philippines needs the likes of Voltaire and Rizal for some much-needed electrifying eye-openingjolts __ now.
    Voltaire and Rizal had a lot of parallel qualities. Both were Jesuit-educated.Both were polymaths ____ polemicists, linguists, naturalists, novelists, poets, etc… Both were exiled for their views, both were deists, and freethinkers. Both were denied decent burials when they died. And both went against and afterthe excessess of the “ancien regime” __ the Church.

  • #145662


    Rod
    Participant

    Wow! what a shocker Padi.Nagtirindog pati su buhok ko.

  • #145657


    BIO
    Participant

    To be Candide, I find Voltaire too irreverent. So, I go with Volta, who isshocking and Ampere who is current. Resistance I can deal with, but only if Inductance and Capacitance are negligible.

  • #145656


    Rod
    Participant

    Welcome back Manay Cho (Nana nene). Miss mi na ika.

  • #136568


    nana noon
    Participant

    In the eighteenth century every form of fanaticism, reinforce intolerance, and superstition was attacked by the militant wit of Francois Marie Arouet, who wrote under the pen name of Voltaire.  Born in Paris 1694, he was educated for the law but decided to become a writer rather than argue dubious cases.  His godfather had introduced him to a circle of loose-living litterateurs=:-) on the fringes of the court.  From then on Voltaire was continually involved in diplomatic cabals and private troubles.  At twenty two,  because of a lampoon on the regent, he was banished from Paris,  the first of several exiles.  At thirty two,  as the result of another altercation,  he was packed off to England, where he spent three years,  read Shakespeare and Milton, met the cognoscenti,  and numbered Pope,  Dryden,  and Gay among his friends.In England his fortune took turn for the better.  Queen Caroline accepted the dedication of his poem La Henriade,  and Voltaire sold English edition for more than a thousand pounds.  The sale, a government lottery,  and some lucky speculations gave him a considerable income.  A few years later he was again in difficulties.  Two of his books were condemned and burned.  To save himself from arrest.  Voltaire fled Lorraine,  where he was sheltered by the erratic but erudite Marquise du Chatelet.At the Marquise’s Chateau de Cirey in Champagne he wrote indefatigably and seemed anchored at last.  However, some semiprivate utterances, as well as new publications, prompted another migration.  For a long time Prussia’s Frederick the Great had made tempting overtures.  Finally accepting the invitation,  Voltaire found himself in Berlin, housed in a a royal palace, with a pension of twenty thousand francs.He was no luckier nor more circumspect in Germany than elsewhere.  He quarreled with Lessing, the much-esteemed German dramatist, suspected a rival in every writer, and was accused of forgery.  Finally he alienated the King himself by foolish attack on the ruler’s character.Voltaire was now sixty.  France refused to allow him a permanent residence and he settled in Switzerland.  He bought a large property a few miles from Geneva,  where he became known as  “the squire of Ferney.”  Here he achieved a measure of contentment and composed, among other challenging pieces.  his masterpiece,  Candide.  At eighty-four he was accorded a triumphant welcome in Paris,  a city he had not seen in almost thirty years.  He was acclaimed by the Academy,  and his last play, Irene, was produced in his honor.  The excitement was too much for him.  He died May 30, 1778, as he had live-scoffing.A prodigious author,  there was no field he hesitated to enter.  He projected himself in plays,  poems,  prose romances,  historical writings,  scientific examinations,  philosophical speculations,  and criticism,  as well as inexhaustible correspondence.  His Philosophical Dictionary,  an alphabet of rapierlike  wit,  bristles with barbs aimed with unerring acuteness at the church,  the literal interpretation of the Bible, ecclesiastical ritual,  and anything resembling privileged orthodoxy.  Candide is a two-edge travesty – a parody of all romantic attitudinizing and a long hilarious satire on the bland optimism of Wilhelm von Leibnitz,  who contended that all things happened for the bes-a belief echoed by  Pope,  who said that “whatever is, is right.”  Voltaire sends the guileless Candide,  accompanied by his preceptor Pangloss,  out on a series of adventures during which they encounter hideous wars,  unspeakable outrages,  casual rape, countless murders, drownings, plagues,  and unremitting tortures in “the best of all possible worlds.”  Never has an author fought dogmatism and intolerance so fiercely, and never has satire been both so amusing and so exuberantly destructive.

    Read from the book
    Treasury of Great Humor
    by: Louis Untermeyer

Viewing 8 posts - 1 through 8 (of 8 total)

You must be logged in to reply to this topic.